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Posts Tagged ‘Marketing’

Author: brianparera

To choose the best advertising clients are one of the most key elements for a business be it new or even an established one. Leading advertising companies offer various services with best business approaches to boost success of your own business. Sure it’s challenging to select the right media and advertising company which will help you to reach success. While choosing the best company you have to be sure that your method is presented effectively to the market and targets the best crowd.

Media and advertising agencies offer various services like branding, typesetting, copywriting, script writing etc. The main objective of any of these companies would be to offer beneficial services and help you take your business to another level. Any entrepreneur should pick a company that has a good reputation available in the market and is reliable. You can examine the best brand in the marketplace and then apply out for the ad agency how the brand useful for advertising and branding services. You can then do some research and find out the services provided by a reputed ad agency and ask for quotations.

You should make certain you select a company which has the capability to promote your business and product available in the market. Good advertising agencies not simply advertise but additionally offer innovative promotion techniques which can be very useful for advertising or branding your product in the market. You also need to make sure that your right audience are targeted while promoting your product. If you’re inside the UAE, you need to take into account that the company you choose offers Arabic advertising, Arabic Typesetting, Arabic Copywriting, Arabic editing, Arabic book translations, Arabic script writing etc.

Choose an advertising agency who has performed the best in the industry. Different companies offer different services and have their own way of taking care of a particular project or business. Some companies design creative advertisements whereas some design innovative methods for your business. It is always better if you find a person which offers both creative ads plus the best strategies for your venture.

It\’s not only important to concentrate on the right consumers but it is incredibly important that we target the consumers at the proper time. An advertising company should offer services really fast. No entrepreneur have enough money to wait for an ad campaign to be made for many years.

There are numerous reliable advertising companies providing amazing services to enhance up your business. All you need to do is, do some search and research to find the best agency in your town.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/significance-about-advertising-and-branding-6596353.html

 

A company having any specific kind of business requires special types of solutions to make its business presence robust and fortified as compare to other rivals present in the market. Without doing this, it has become such a challenge, which cannot be tackled by any company. For selling its brand and products or services associated with it to the customers, what is highly prominent is to look for such ways, which can be used a direct communication marketing with the customers. Amid all the solutions available pay per call marketing somewhere fits in the criteria. This is the kind of solution offering side in the arena of marketing, which is not only supreme in the form of providing increased sales and revenue to the company but also it is less time taking and requires less amount to invest as compare to other ideas.

But before going on with pay per call marketing option, it is mandatory to understand the type of this website and kind of solutions it adds to the account of company. Along with that, this should be taken into full consideration that in which way these solutions should be implemented to get the finest results ever. The purpose of switching to a pay per call like method of business promotion and marketing is needed to be known by the company before making any sort of investment and the first and very valuable motive behind this is to accomplish high levels of business acceleration and profit amplification.

To make sure that these all benefits are in-cashed well during the time of using pay per call solutions, the company should make sure that it has complete knowledge about the kind of service it is applying for business growth. In the process of these pay per call services, the company offers pay per call ads on the different websites, with the contact number and specially the timings in which the interested users can call to that number for any further reference or query. This connects the customers with the company easily and without wastage of any time. And, it also offers the company with the chance to create a great impression of the company on customer’s mind.

All in all, it can be clearly termed as that pay per call ads has a very valuable and highly significant role to play for the benefit of a company during the implementation of marketing solutions.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/ppc-advertising-articles/raising-trends-of-pay-per-call-marketing-6128193.html

Author: Kaitlin

Author: Gabrielle Jeans

Today, all real estate professionals must create their own business identity through their branding.  Long gone are the days when we could rely on our company name for our branding.

One of the most important aspects of branding is consistency.  You should be using the same wording (eg. business name, slogan) and graphic design elements for your business identity in all areas of your promotional material.

Domain Name – your domain name should be synonymous with your core business branding, so use it everywhere in your promotional materials.  The goal is having your website name easily remembered and top of mind with prospects when they need a real estate professional’s services.  So have it prominent in the letterhead on your 8.5′ x 11′ print stationary, sticky notes, note pads, business cards, quotation and invoice templates, and any fliers you send out.

Spreading It Everywhere

Branding is psychological.  With branding you’re trying to influence the way people think, not just make your brand memorable.  To some extent your ability to influence people is a function of the quantity of your branding.  The more you advertise, the more likely you’ll be remembered.

Practically speaking, you don’t have a Fortune 500 sized marketing budget, so you need to make the best of what you’ve got.  On your website have your site’s name and logo prominent but not obtrusive on every page.  Have your website link in your email signature.  Write guest articles for popular real estate blogs so you can demonstrate your expertise in a forum recognized as less biased than your own blog.

Comment on blog articles related to real estate and include your website link every time.  Engage in real estate discussions on forum sites like Active Rain and include your website link in your signature when ending each message.  These are great ways of leveraging what you’ve already got in terms of expertise and promotion and making them go even further for you for little or no additional expense.  All of these things will help a lot with your ranking in major search engines like Google.

You can get the most bang for your marketing buck these days by advertising online.  Purchase online banner ads on real estate related websites.  Launch a pay-per-click campaign with a major search engine like Google.  Purchase premium placement for your ads on highly popular classifieds sites like Kijiji and ones local to you.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/branding-for-success-in-real-estate-6046714.html

About the Author

Gabrielle Jeans is an iconic Real Estate Trainer in the North American real estate industry. Founder and CEO of e2000 Training Institute Inc. and Web Tech Dezine Inc., Gabrielle has helped thousands of real estate professionals across North America take their business to new levels of profitability, market penetration and brand recognition. Serving as a coach, mentor and management consultant to everyone from new agents and seasoned veterans to large multi-office real estate brokerages and regional real estate boards, Ms. Jeans empowers real estate agents and sales managers with the tools and strategies to realize exponential growth in business, and it is not uncommon for her clients to enjoy 100to 200 increases in revenue streams within months of retaining her services.

Author: drypen

For the brand concept encompasses all of the brand’s distinctive signs ( name, logo, symbol, colors, endorsing characteristics and even its slogan), it is the brand name that is talked about, asked for or prescribed. It is therefore natural that we should devote particular attention to this fact of the brand creation process: choosing a name for the brand.

What is the best name to choose to build a strong brand? Is there anywhere a particular type of name that can thus guarantee brand success? Looking at some so-called strong brands will help us answer these usual questions: Coca-Cola, IBM, Marlboro, Perrier, Dim, Kodak, and Schweppes … what do these brand names have in common? Coca-Cola referred to the product’s ingredients when it was first created; the original meaning of IBM (International Business Machines) has disappeared; Schweppes is hard to pronounce; Marlboro is a place; Kodak, onomatopoeia. The conclusion of this quick overview is reassuring: to make a strong brand, any name can be used (or almost any), provided that there is a consistent effort over time to give meaning to this name, i.e. to give the brand a meaning of its own.

Does this mean that there is no need to give much thought to the brand name, apart from the mere problem of ensuring that the brand can be registered? Not at all, because following some basic selection rules and trying to choose the right name will save you time, perhaps several years, when it comes to making the baby brand a big brand. The question of time is crucial: the brand has to conquer a territory of its own. From the very start, therefore, it must anticipate all of its potential changes.

The brand name must be chosen with a view to the brand’s future and destiny, not in relation to the specific market and product situation at the time of its birth. As companies generally function the other way around, it seems more than appropriate to provide some immediate information on the usual pitfalls to avoid when choosing a brand name, and also to give a reminder of certain principles.

Brand name or product name?

Choosing a name depends on the destiny that is assigned to the brand. One must therefore distinguish the type of research related to creating a full-fledged brand name – destined to expand internationally, to cover a large product line, and to last – from the opposite related to creating a product name with a more limited scope in space and time. Emphasis, process time and financial investments will certainly be different in both cases.

The danger of descriptive names

Ninety per cent of the time, manufacturers want the brand name to describe the product which the brand is going to endorse. They like the name to describe what the product does (an aspirin that would be called Headache) or is (a biscuit brand that would be called Biscuito; a direct banking service called Bank Direct). This preference for denotative names shows that companies do not understand what brands are all about and what their purpose really is. Remember: brands do not describe products – brands distinguish products.

Choosing a descriptive name also amounts to missing out on all the potential of global communication. The product’s characteristics and qualities will be presented to the target-audience thanks to the advertisements, the sales people, direct marketing, articles in specialized periodicals and the comparative studies done by consumer associations. It would thus be a waste to have the brand name merely repeat the same message that all these communication means will convey in a much more efficient and complete way. The name, on the contrary must serve to add extra meaning, to convey the spirit of the brand. For products do not live forever: their lifecycle is indeed limited.

The meaning of the brand name should not get mixed up with the product characteristics that a brand presents when it is first created. The founders of Apple were well aware of this: within a few weeks the market would know that Apple made microcomputers it was therefore unnecessary to fall into the trap of names such as Micro computers International or computer Research systems. In calling themselves Apple, on the contrary, they could straightaway convey the brands durable uniqueness (and not just the characteristics of the temporary Apple-1): this uniqueness has to do more with the other facts of brand identity that with its physique (i.e. its culture, its relationship, its personality, etc).

The brand is not the product. The brand name therefore should not describe what the product does but reveal or suggest a difference.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/how-to-choose-a-strong-brand-name-5995311.html

About the Author

Drypen provides action-oriented intelligence for management professionals that’s smart, useful, crisp and just a click away.

A Brand Building Strategy Hub

Author: David Little

While stock markets around the world retrace, the financial picture of Greece and Spain flounders and the world holds its collective breath waiting to see if there’ll be an attack on Iran and a spike in oil prices, there is a piece of outstanding economic news for those involved in the place-based digital media market.

2011 was a great year for digital out-of-home advertising, and this year is setting up to be even better. Data from PQ Media released in April show that global digital place-based networks, billboards and signage operators saw revenue grow by 15.3 percent to $6.97 billion last year. This year, the revenue figure is projected to be even better, growing 19.2 percent.

In the United States, DOOH operator revenue climbed by 11.2 percent last year. According to PQ Media, an econometric research and consulting service in Stamford, CT, digital billboard operators saw double-digit revenue growth and operators of place-based networks saw a high single-digital rate of growth.

According to the PQ Media “Global Digital Out-of-Home Media Forecast 2012-16,” the compound annual global growth rate for the five year period will be 13.7 percent. Much of the revenue growth appears tied to a recognition of how important it is to reach consumers outside the home where they make purchases. “While TV remains the 800-pound gorilla of ad-based media due to its reach, scarcity and measurement, DPNs (digital place-based networks) offer brands opportunities to extend their reach by engaging target consumers with contextually relevant content in venues outside the home,” said PQ Media CEO Patrick Quinn.

Digital signage networks were one of the fastest-growing ad-based media in the United States last year. While PQ Media acknowledged a deceleration in the rate of growth in the second half of 2011 due to cyclical economic events, it found digital place-based networks experienced a revenue increase of 10.7 percent from 2006 to 2011.

According to PQ Media, digital place-based networks are likely to benefit indirectly from the Summer Olympics in London and the U.S. political campaign this fall. Both traditionally inject significant revenue into local television stations as well as cable and broadcast networks. This time around, however, PQ Media foresees a scarcity of TV inventory. As a result, major brands squeezed off television could be forced to consider other video platforms, such as digital place-based networks, said Quinn.

The latest revenue tally from PQ Media is another in a growing string of positive developments over the past couple of years for the digital signage industry. Together, they wins demonstrate that digital placed-based media is a viable and being taken seriously by companies with products to sell and the advertising agencies they hire.

The growing availability of audience metrics for digital place-based media is adding a sense of legitimacy about this new medium for those who control where ad dollars get spent. The PQ Media ad revenue numbers, therefore, shouldn’t be too surprising.

Going forward, the next big test for this medium will likely be whether or not those responsible for buying ads will reallocate dollars from television to digital place-based media.

With the possibility of too few available commercial slots on TV in the second half of the year, there might be a hint as to whether digital place-based media can begin taking on the “800-pound gorilla” and winning.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/advertising-articles/digital-signage-advertising-hits-its-stride-5986204.html

About the Author

David Little is a charter member of the Digital Screenmedia Association with 20 years of experience helping professionals use technology to effectively communicate. For further digital signage insight from Keywest Technology, visit our website for many helpful tips and examples. For more in-depth research from Keywest Technology, download our free digital signage white papers and case studies.

Author: Tim Hawthorne

Direct response is all about getting consumers to take action. Pick up the phone, visit a website, respond to an ad on a mobile phone — these are all responses that direct marketers focus on as they develop campaigns. It just makes sense that quick response (QR) codes would have a place in a DR marketer’s toolkit.

First developed in Japan in 1994, these high-density, two-dimensional graphic images are basically just barcodes comprised of digital squares instead of bars. The composite of these ‘squares,’ often looking like crossword puzzles on steroids, come together to create codes, which, in turn, house the data that are scanned by mobile devices. The devices quickly scan and digest the code’s information block, translating it into hyperlinks or text information.

QR codes are being used across a wide variety of advertising mediums — from magazine ads to television to billboards. They allow for easy tracking of offline marketing efforts, provide a new channel for direct sales, and help stretch advertising dollars. Using QR codes, for example, marketers can cultivate a bigger pool of VIP customers (who take the time to scan the codes into their phones) and educate consumers in ways that billboards or magazine ads or 30-second TV spots cannot, while increasing brand awareness.

QR codes are also good at getting consumers involved in key issues. To gain public support for the restoration of the Gulf of Mexico in the aftermath of the 2010 oil spill, for example, the Women of the Storm club in New Orleans launched a ‘Be the One’ campaign, based on QR codes that sent consumers to a mobile website where they could watch a video and sign a petition in support of Gulf restoration.

Retailers have also caught onto the value of QR codes. Macy’s has integrated the codes into its holiday advertising campaign and its spring fashion promotion. The ‘Macy’s Backstage Pass’ campaign delivers consumer-oriented video content (including fashion advice, tips, trends and inspirations) according to Marketing Daily. Customers who scan the QR codes gain access to 30-second films showcasing Macy’s celebrity designer partners.

The list of QR code users goes on: Best Buy uses them in its offline ads and in-store displays (once scanned, the codes send consumers to the retailer’s mobile product pages), while clothing retailer Lacoste offers a discount to customers who scan its QR codes, play an online arcade game, and then register after playing.

Simple and affordable to set up and administer, the QR code’s low barrier to entry makes these mechanisms attractive across a wide swath of advertisers. To ensure that your own campaign yields the best results, follow these three tips:

1. Define your goals first. Do you want to get more people to your firm’s website? Provide an instructional video? Give certain customers an inside, VIP look at new offerings? Collect registration information? Whittle it down to one or two specific goals and your odds for success will rise exponentially.

2. Focus on the call to action. Much like you would do with a DRTV campaign, develop a well-defined call to action (CTA) to support the goals you’ve identified. That CTA will reside next to the code itself and should be short and to the point. For example: ‘Scan this code to see our newest attraction,’ or ‘Scan this code for a special discount.’

3. Create a compelling landing page. The mobile landing page that consumers see when they scan the QR code should relate directly to the first two steps. Create a dedicated site that only QR code users can access and make sure the site functions well on all mobile handsets.

When assessing the campaign’s success, focus on the length of engagement time generated by the QR code. If consumers are spending several minutes (or more) on the page you’ve directed them to, you have a successful campaign on your hands. If not, it’s time to revisit your campaign, check your code’s scanability (an issue caused by the many different scanning apps and phones currently in use), re-craft your CTA, and try again.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/deciphering-the-qr-code-5941089.html

About the Author

Author of over 200 published articles, Tim Hawthorne is Founder, Chairman and CEO of Hawthorne Direct, a full service DRTV and New Media ad agency founded in 1986. Since then, Hawthorne has produced or managed over 800 Direct Response TV campaigns for clients such as Apple, Braun, Nikon,Time-Life, Nissan, Oreck, Bose, and Feed the Children, Tim is a co-founder of the Electronic Retailing Association, has delivered over 100 speeches worldwide and is the author of the definitive DRTV book The Complete Guide to Infomercial Marketing. A cum laude graduate of Harvard, Tim was honored with the prestigious ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ by the Electronic Retailing Association (ERA) in 2006.

Author:
Mark Dale

A measly sounding improvement in this conversion rate could easily mean a improvement in your overall profitability.

Nothing to be sneezed at!!

Many online marketers are satisfied with 2-3% conversion rates.

But why settle for the mere average when there are marketers out there with proven 10 20& 30(or more!) conversion rates?

(If you don’t believe these conversion rates are possible, email Nettclicks for a real case study which will show you that this is easily attainable within a short time frame)

There are many important elements on you landing page that can help you boost conversion rates almost immediately. These are:

1. Headline – a powerful headline on your landing page will commit visitors to read on. Grab their attention, make them curious, appeal to their immediate needs & tell them so explicitly in numbers if you can. And don’t be afraid to use long headlines and sub-headlines if they help to get the point across.

Does headline a) or b) below grabs your attention? And why?

a) The Best Accounting Software in the World: Available With Acclaimed Support when You Buy From the Industry Trusted ABC Co.

b) Work Dilemma: Do You Go Home Early or a Have Longer Lunch?

XYZ guarantees to save you at least 41 mins per day in your book-keeping duties…and it’s totally up to you on how you spend all that extra time!

Once you think you have a good powerful headline, you must test it and improve on it! (If you don’t know how to do this, contact Nettclicks for free advise)

2. Scarcity – make your offer(s) urgent and/or scarce. Putting a time or quantity limit so that it propels the visitors to commit to an action. If there is no urgency to commit to anything, they are likely to leave and never come back (or find a better offer that compels them to act!)

3. Use Multimedia – your landing page can stand out through the use of video or audio media. It adds extra sensory elements to the decision process, especially if what you offer on audio/video can capture their imagination or teach them something useful.

It can also help with verifying authenticity when they hear a reassuring voice or an honest face explaining an offer or process to them.

(Nettclicks can show you how to implant a relevant YouTube video on to your landing page to help with your sales conversion – without violating copyright laws – reply email to find out how)

4. You, Not We – cut out uses of WE, meaning you should cut down on any excessive self promotion.

Visitors are essentially selfish – so get to their point of  ‘what’s in it for me?’

Use YOU regularly instead of WE and use language/graphics that appeal to the visitor in the first person so there is better connection on the landing page.

5. Testimonials work – good testimonials add a sense of reliability and ‘social proof’ factor to your offer. Refer to good reviews, post genuine testimonials and use them liberally to show that your products and services have been well received by other like minded people/organizations.

6. Bullet proof – research has shown that many visitors scan through landing pages quickly – so whatever your landing page is (long or short) there should be concise bullet points somewhere to summarize the benefits and features. Bullet points are eye-candy for the time-poor and attention-poor visitors online – they will get it quickly if you can get the message across concisely.

7. Be secure – information privacy and payment securely at big factors in online transactions. Make sure your landing page has the right graphics and concise language to appease security/privacy conscious visitors (if you would like some examples of good graphics/page layout to help with offering visitors that better sense of online security, reply to Nettclicks for more details)

8. Guarantee it – Bunnings has a no-questions-asked return guarantee on all their products. That offers trust and comfort.

So should you!

Your landing page should always offer your products and services with a guarantee – research shows that without it, you have no hope of converting traffic. And if you guarantee it, deliver on that guarantee. Nothing worse than being lampooned on social media if you don’t deliver on promises!!

9. Clear CTA – you should continually check that your landing page has a concise Call to Action for your visitors. If you want them to buy – show them clearly where to click to buy. If you want them to opt in for a free email report – show them clearly (and regularly) on how to opt in.

(If you are not sure whether your landing page has a clear and concise CTA, contact Nettclicks for an obligation free opinion)

By following these 9 pointers for a better converting land page, you too can get your landing page conversion rates to 10o% & beyond!

As usual, should you have any questions or need a clarification on any of the tips discussed on this email, please don’t hesitate to call or email Nettclicks.

Good luck in your traffic conversion!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/ppc-advertising-articles/9-landing-page-fixes-to-improve-conversions-5944575.html

About the Author

As usual, should you have any questions or need a clarification on any of the tips discussed on this email, please don’t hesitate to call or email Nettclicks.

Good luck in your traffic conversion!

Author: Tim Hawthorne

When someone copycats a legitimate DRTV product, everyone loses. Consumers get inferior products and may even get hurt by the counterfeit versions. The original marketer loses sales, incurs legal expenses and winds up with a damaged reputation. The industry as a whole gets a black eye as customers complain about the purchase to friends, family and co-workers.

The hotter the product, the better the odds that it will be counterfeited either domestically or in China, where counterfeiting is big business. The Department of Homeland Security estimates that 81 percent of all counterfeits in the U.S. come from mainland China.

Denise Kovac, president of Full Service Marketing and former COO of Your Baby Can LLC, knows firsthand how persistent and destructive counterfeiters are. As the purveyors of the innovative child development product Your Baby Can Read, Kovac and her team kept close tabs on counterfeiting activity for the popular product.

In one blatant example, Kovac says a company had the gall to put out a copycat version of the product with book pages that were riddled with spelling errors. ‘We started getting customer service calls, asking us to correct the issue,’ Kovac recalls, ‘and it wasn’t even our product.’

Kovac estimates that copycats rob DRTV marketers of 5 percent to 25 percent of their earned sales, mainly because the culprits pay no advertising, marketing, promotional or royalty expenses in order to make their sales.

To get out in front of the problem, Kovac says marketers must pay attention to which companies are selling their items online and sign E-commerce agreements with each of them. Kovac says, ‘The only way to make sure products are all legitimate is by keeping a ‘24/7′ eye on who is selling those items.’

Visiting countries where counterfeiting runs rampant is another strategy. ‘I’ve sourced the copycats all the way back to China,’ Kovac explains. ‘Then, posing as a buyer, I was exposed to more than 100 different SKUs of various products for sale. All of them were counterfeit.’

The confusion that copycatting causes for consumers is a real concern for DRTV marketers. The idea that consumers ‘don’t know’ that they’re buying knock-offs is real. In a 2009 study, British Brands Group concluded that 33 percent of consumers have purchased a copycat, believing they’d actually bought the better-known brand.

Fitness Quest Inc. of Canton, Ohio, has found itself combating multiple counterfeiters. ‘People pick up on the fact that a product is selling well and decide to make a slight change to it and call it their own,’ says Karel Rolli, director of electronic sales for the firm, whose products include Gazelle Gliders and the Ab Lounge. ‘They call it a different name, put it on the market and start selling it.’

Rolli says Fitness Quest has dealt with both domestic and international counterfeiting. One of the worst cases involved an overseas manufacturer that was making the company’s ‘legitimate’ products on one assembly line and the knock-offs on a different line – all under the same roof.

Dealing with copycats is a full-time job for Fitness Quest. ‘We spend a lot of money every year fighting this,’ says Rolli. In some instances, the firm’s customer service team picks up on the illegal activity first. The consumer who calls in for technical support with a product serial number that doesn’t exist in Fitness Quest’s database, for example, lets the firm know that something isn’t right.

Marketers can combat the counterfeiting problem on several different fronts. Unique branding and messages; the use of copyrights and patents whenever possible; the creation of multiple ordering options; and regular product ‘tweaks’ are some of the best anti-counterfeiting strategies. Adopting a proactive, never-back-down stance against the thugs who spend their lives copycatting successful products also goes a long way to thwarting this persistent challenge.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/why-counterfeiting-hurts-5771116.html

About the Author

Author of over 200 published articles, Tim Hawthorne is Founder, Chairman and CEO of Hawthorne Direct, a full service DRTV and New Media ad agency founded in 1986. Since then, Hawthorne has produced or managed over 800 Direct Response TV campaigns for clients such as Apple, Braun, Nikon,Time-Life, Nissan, Oreck, Bose, and Feed the Children, Tim is a co-founder of the Electronic Retailing Association, has delivered over 100 speeches worldwide and is the author of the definitive DRTV book The Complete Guide to Infomercial Marketing. A cum laude graduate of Harvard, Tim was honored with the prestigious \\\’Lifetime Achievement Award\\\’ by the Electronic Retailing Association (ERA) in 2006.

Author: Linda Mentzer

With super-connectivity, comes increased levels of user influence, and we’d like to take a moment to discuss the where the future of sustained branding lies. Here we’ve put together three of the crucial aspects that marketers need to adapt to in order to achieve superior levels of user engagement and brand advocacy.

1. For The People

It isn’t often that consumers begin to feel an unquenchable love for your products and organization because of the charming sales pitch that your rep delivered. It’s the actual user experience, the product function that they admire and it’s the emotions created by your collateral that drives them to advocacy. And before I forget, it’s also the kind of treatment they receive at your hands. Bad service = zero brandgelising.

2. Keep ‘Em On Their Toes

Consistency is the buzz word when it comes to marketing, and that is increasingly true given the accelerating pace of life we now face. Today’s consumer is the informed consumer – informed to such a degree that I believe the world of hard sell is slowly being rendered completely obsolete. And that’s why it’s vital that marketers keep their best customers on their toes and excited if they intend to develop product-toting, praise-singing brand angels. And yes, social media plays a heavy role in the above advice (more on that later).

You’ll know that your brand advocacy efforts are making headway when you begin to see a lot more repeat customers. Sure, the mass of one-time purchases is what keeps you rolling in dough, but it’s those that buy again and again and again and then some that are on their way to a tryst with your brand.

3. Condensing The World, One Post At A Time

What I said earlier about the informed consumer? This is plays an even more important role in the rapidly widening scope of social media. The ‘network’ seems poised to take over our lives as we become increasingly interconnected. Unlike the one-way public communication that we are used to experiencing, the interactivity of our virtual social space has added new dimensions to the broader flow of conversation. And although this phenomenon is hardly new, the fact that it is unfolding in space that is as sensitive to fluctuation as social media is what most marketers seem to be blind sighted by.

4. Be A Customer Service Nazi
Despite living in an age where one pissed off customer can negate an entire campaign through the power of social media, I still see companies trying to maximize short term gains at the expense of customer service protocols and after-sales initiatives.

I’m well aware that the need to meet profitability quotas can seem overridingly important, but it’s sad to see those objectives achieved at the cost of an increasingly dissatisfied customer-base. Instead, take a long term view and adopt a customer-centric service policy that is consistently upheld and you’ll see true brand advocacy work its magic. In the grand scheme of things, your boss will thank you for it.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/2012-the-changing-face-of-b2b-brand-advocacy-5738926.html

About the Author

Linda Mentzer is a published author and senior marketing manager for an information management company that has helped sell thousands of software products on a global scale. With over 11 years of experience in electronic marketing techniques, Linda has authored articles for several leading business journals, worldwide.

Author: Tim Hawthorne

Armed with an insatiable appetite for the unique, pretty, ugly, soft and cuddly, today’s kids want more toys, dolls, art kits, pillows, music and entertainment than ever. They don’t even have credit cards yet, but their voices and buying habits are already being heard – and heeded – in many households.

Answering the call is a group of manufacturers and marketers that have their fingers on the pulse of the children’s market. They work in a category that hasn’t historically ranked high on the DRTV charts despite the fact that it racks up millions of unit sales annually.

Targeted to toddlers, pre-teens, teenagers and their parents, fun and educational products often translate into successful retail, web and catalogue plays. That not only helps extend brand life – Kidz Bop, for example, is currently in its 14th version – but also ensures that the products reach multiple generations of children over time.

Market research firm Packaged Facts reports that the kids’ market reached over $21 billion in disposable income in 2010, and that families spent more than $115 billion on kids in key consumer areas, such as food, clothing, personal-care items, entertainment and reading materials.

The fact that kids have a lot to say about how that money is spent translates into major opportunities for marketers who get into the minds of these young buyers and figure out what they want.

Sometimes the answer lies in the simplest of ideas. Bees, ladybugs, dogs and unicorns took on new identities in 2003 when Doug Fowkes introduced the world to Pillow Pets. The folding stuffed animals have since morphed into an entire line of plush products that includes blankets, hats and even bedroom slippers. The concept of an animal-shaped pillow is simple enough, but it took Fowkes’ marketing genius and a boost from DRTV to turn these products into a real goldmine.

John Miller, a pioneer who helped build the kids’ category with Better Blocks, Floam, Bendaroos and Pixos, is current president and creative director at Hutton-Miller in Boca Raton, Fla. Miller says those early products – plus newer innovations like Happy Nappers™ and the Gyro Bowl™ — have all helped to drive the children’s category.

‘We realized early on that success in this category depended on how excited children got over the products, and whether they could get their parents to pick up the phone and place orders,’ says Miller. ‘We call it ‘pester power’ and it works very well with kids’ products.’

However, the children’s category can be fickle:  Kids sniff out inferior products quickly and jettison them to the bottom of the toy box. ‘The key is to produce and advertise quality products that truly excite the child,’ says Miller, who calls DRTV the ‘jumping-off point’ for all other distribution channels. ‘DRTV toy commercials have evolved from simply introducing products to creating categories that everyone jumps in on.’

Robert Yusim, president of Product Counsel DRTV in Winnipeg, helped bring to market DRTV products like Moon Sand, Moon Dough, Air Hogs and Vectron Wave. He says the most successful children’s DRTV shows center on fun creative treatments that include the appropriate balance of product demonstrations, fun displays and ‘magic transformations’ that ooh and ah the young audience. ‘Getting kids to react and then lobby their parents is the hardest part,’ says Yusim. ‘You can only do that through compelling creative.’

The momentum established by the many children’s products that left their mark on the DRTV world has opened doors for companies seeking a direct channel for their youth-oriented products.

Both infomercials and short-form commercials have proven themselves as effective ways to sell kids’ products and to create brand awareness and desire among a diminutive but influential component of today’s households.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/who-says-kids-products-dont-sell-on-drtv-5771232.html

About the Author

Author of over 200 published articles, Tim Hawthorne is Founder, Chairman and CEO of Hawthorne Direct, a full service DRTV and New Media ad agency founded in 1986. Since then, Hawthorne has produced or managed over 800 Direct Response TV campaigns for clients such as Apple, Braun, Nikon,Time-Life, Nissan, Oreck, Bose, and Feed the Children, Tim is a co-founder of the Electronic Retailing Association, has delivered over 100 speeches worldwide and is the author of the definitive DRTV book The Complete Guide to Infomercial Marketing. A cum laude graduate of Harvard, Tim was honored with the prestigious ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ by the Electronic Retailing Association (ERA) in 2006.

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