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Posts Tagged ‘Brand Makeover’

Author: Diganta Kumar Barooah

A case-study may be defined as an analysis of a given scenario or a situation that often regarded as a challenge for an establishment. A case-study gives a solution to a problem which might be technical or non-technical. It is often seen that case-studies play an important role in establishing a strong opinion about finding the ways to solve a business challenge. Manufacturing giants and business service providers are mostly benefited by the facts they share about their products/services through these studies.

In current business scenario, case studies are not just limited to any management curriculum. They are widely used for brand-building activities. These studies often help the business giants to establish themselves as the thought leaders in their respective segment. The main challenge in designing a case study could be inspiring the reader to make a favorable decision. Even tiny little things like the design and layout could impact readers\’ decision making process. The content has to provide potential customers, investors and/or partners the information they require to make buying or investment decisions. It should also showcase the first-hand experience with a company, product or service and hence build credibility. The case evaluates the effectiveness of a product or service. Hence, the writer should be careful in delivering message through this new form of journalism that complements traditional mediums of advertising.

A case study can also help introducing a new product or service with impact extending the value of advertising message with in-depth and content-rich coverage. An effective message will surely generate the desired impact. Designing an influential case-study involves lots of research on how others have defined the situation. If the situation is common then the challenge is more as you will also have to deal with a competitive scenario and you have to establish the facts in favor of your product/service. Interviewing the key resources in developing the case helps you establish the facts. These skilled resources can be quoted directly to present it in more convincing way.

Detailed analysis of all the information collected plays a significant role in ascertaining your overall statement that you are well-versed with the situation. Finally, conclude the study in such a way that it gives a fruitful solution to the situation described. The whole purpose of designing a case can not be successful without a clear and crisp message. A message that directly influences your potential customers, investors and/or partners to make a investment decision.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/impact-of-a-case-study-in-building-brand-credibility-6426124.html

About the Author

As a science post graduate, Diganta Kumar Barooah started his career in pharmaceutical and life-sciences business research further taking up challenges in other industry verticals in new media and digital marketing space. With five years of professional experience, he has demonstrated his digital media research, communications and alalytical capabilities in handling complex business scenarios. He has held several senior positions in companies like EmPower Research – A Genpact company, Macmillan Publishing Solutions and Cyber Media Services Ltd.

Author: Tim Somers

Business success can be harder than ever these days. With more competition and a difficult economy the stakes behind every business decision can be the life or death of your business. One of the biggest challenges is to get the word about your company out and keep what you offer fresh in your customers minds. These issues can mean the difference between a thriving business and one about to go under, and should never be treated lightly. A great solution and winning move to accomplish these goals is using promotional products!

Here are some tips to consider regarding a promotional product campaign.

* Quick and Effective Advertising. Promotional products are a solid, efficient way to keep you on the customers mind and your name coming out of your customer’s lips. Put some thought into choosing the right sort of promotional product, one that represents your industry well and they’ll pay themselves off a hundred fold. For example coffee mugs may not be the best choice if you market children’s toys but calendars with cool and creative photos of the toys on them on the other hand may be spot on! Think about how many people throughout a work day would look at the images of your product, and the number of potential conversations it could inspire as well.

* Use The Best That’s Available. Be sure to have your promotional products made to the highest quality that your budget can afford. This is a reflection of your company when they are given to clients so not a time to skimp or cut corners. Think of it as an investment in smart advertising, which is exactly what it is.

* Test The Unconventional. Let’s not forget the value of other sorts of promotional products to raise your business’s street profile. Think of t-shirts, balloons or even umbrellas to get your name and logo in the public mind. It’s advertising that will pay off dividends, in many cases for a long time to come.

* Don’t Take Them Lightly. Think maximum exposure and how your promotional products can be a vital part of your overall campaign to spread the word about your business. Clients, people on the street, highly visual products that spread virally – when combined with more traditional methods of advertising all aspects of a common drive with the goal of generating more business. In this age this is what’s required for a successful business – covering all grounds available and exhausting all means of publicity.

* Free Is Key. Don’t forget the perception that you’re giving something away for free helps build a good vibe with your customers and potential customers. You send the message that you’re not money hungry and that they come first in your mind. It’s only the rare customer not charmed by this gesture of good will.

All in all a blistering promotional product campaign is one of the wisest moves a smart business can make in response to a challenging economy. Don’t neglect them if you intend on staying on the cutting edge and clearing out the competition.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/smart-tips-for-promotional-products-6381008.html

About the Author

Bizarre Marketing is a leader in promotional products in Nashville Tennessee with over 20 years of service offering over 750,000 imprintable items to businesses, clubs, churches and associations in Nashville TN and throughout the country.  http://www.promostuff4u.com/promotional-products-tennessee.html

Author: Meagan Hollman

Mobile devices are quickly sweeping the world. Of those who own mobile phones in America, more than half (53%) of those are smart phones. With every change in the communications industry, the advertising industry has had to adapt or die. Most recently, online marketing companies are worried that the global sweep of mobile devices will destroy their business. Due to the smaller screens, lack of advertising room, and entire medium shift, digital marketing companies in Utah and the rest of the world will have to reevaluate the advertising experience of their constituency.

The troubles of adapting to new media have proved difficult so far. As with any disruption of paradigm, agencies have had to dramatically alter their paradigms. Companies like Facebook and Google, whose revenue is made primarily from online advertising, have already held multiple conferences concerning this shift to mobile internet access. To someone outside of the industry, making the shift from monitors and computers to pads and smartphones may sound negligible. However, even subtle changes in communication forum (which this case is not) can destroy the potential of entire conglomerates. Even more dramatically, some market critics are wondering if this shift will kill online marketing. As apocalyptic as this may sound, the answer is surely not as hopeless. Within and without Utah’s borders, new online marketing strategies are being developed to combat the trouble of creating a new advertising experience.

Since smaller screens are not fit for advertising banners and pop-ups have quickly become a disrespected form of advertising, new models must be invented. Some of the new ideas include personalization: ad agencies, with the search history and page views of favorite websites, customize a set of suggested types of advertisements for each group of people. Apps are another media which could be used by companies to urge customers into their service. For example, Amazon has an app which can scan items and give you their comparative online prices. Amazon and even local companies in Utah are formulated clever ways to utilize apps and turn the mobile revolution in their favor. 

Adapting has never been an issue for Utah’s online marketing agencies. After all, the shift to online business didn’t abolish the industry or even cripple it. In fact, online marketing is now more advanced and more utilized every day. Agencies who haven’t adapted have fallen into the oblivion of irrelevance. Those agencies who have survived have done so willingly and have flourished because of it. This new revolution of media offers just that opportunity for new agencies to emerge.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/online-promotion-articles/the-times-they-are-a-changing-6222878.html

 

Author: Maria Elena Duron

As a small business owner, you’re probably happy about where you currently are. You’re chugging along like a slow train, targeting mostly your family and friends and the local community, and you’re happy with the small amount of success your brand is getting. You don’t really want to make it big. You just want to relax and enjoy having a small business…

Or maybe not. As a small business owner, you probably dream about making it big. You want to be able to compete with the big brands, to become as well known as they are. Perhaps you want to become a big brand as well…

But you’re disheartened. How can you compete with the big corporations? How can your small business brand compare with these giants? They have unlimited capital, unlimited resources, and unlimited manpower. You’re practically a one-man (or woman) show, with maybe one or two employees. You’re up to the neck in debt since you borrowed money to start your small business.  Do you even have a chance of competing against these big brands?

The fact is, no matter what you do, you simply can’t compete with these big corporations on the same terms. As a small business brand, you aren’t capable of doing that because you just don’t have the means. But don’t lose hope, because there are other ways you can compete with them – it’s all about planning and strategy.

Here are some tips to help go up against the big brands:

     1. Offer value

Honestly, you can’t compete with the big guns in terms of price. You’ll just end up burying yourself, since people may think that the products and services you offer are not up to par with the big brands. Instead, always offer value – sure, your products and services may be a bit more expensive, but it’s because you’re offering something unique, worthwhile, and valuable to the consumers.

     2. Focus on what you do best

Maybe it’s customer service, maybe it’s storytelling, maybe it’s social media… but as a small business brand, you need to focus on what you do best in order to shine and be noticed. Don’t just copy what other businesses are doing. Focus on what makes you unique and the things you can best offer to people.

Providing excellent customer service is one of the best ways to reach consumers effectively. As a small business brand, you can ensure that someone always checks your email and answers your telephone line in order to address any customer’s concerns.

Storytelling on social media sites is another way you can stand out and be noticed. People love rooting for the underdog, and if you’re going up against a big brand, then you’re definitely one—so tell them the stories that will give them cause to sympathize or cheer. In short, tell them whatever will help them identify with you and wish for your success.

     3. Be more personable

As a small business owner, you can really represent your brand in a personal way that big corporations cannot. Show off your personality, put a face behind the name, go the extra mile for your customers. This really makes your small business brand stand out. Remember that people enjoy connecting and engaging with real people, not businesses. They want to know you, and become friends with you. They want to like and trust you.

People don’t just buy from anybody anymore. They’re a lot more vigilant when it comes to evaluating businesses, and they either love a brand or they hate it. When you become personable and likeable as a small business owner, you can really connect with your customers – they will definitely prefer talking to you over a big brand. After all when they contact a big brand, they usually just talk to a random, faceless,  nameless person.

     4. Utilize social media wisely

Social media is a great equalizer – it’s really changed the way people connect with brands, which is why both small and big business brands seem to have an equal chance in this regard. Sure, big brands may have the big bucks, but most social media platforms allow you to engage with your fans and followers for free – all you need to do is devote time and effort to your page.

Maintain a blog, create a Facebook and Twitter account, and don’t forget to update them regularly and interact with your audience using these platforms. Social media marketing is an excellent way to promote your small business brand, since a single update can spread like wildfire through these sites if it’s interesting enough.

Concluding Thoughts 

As you consider how to get ahead as a small business, don’t even try to compete with big corporations on their own turf… Without their money and resources, you can never win. Instead, offer value on the products and services that you sell, focus on what you do best, be more personable, and remember to use social media wisely. These are the simple ways small business brands can compete with the big guns.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/small-brands-up-against-big-brands-6103082.html

About the Author

‘Maria Elena Duron, CEO (chief engagement officer), buzz2bucks | a word of mouth marketing firm, is skilled at making networks ‘work’ and harnessing powerful online and offline buzz, she facilitates online visibility services and word of mouth coaching and workshops – taking companies and professionals from buzz-worthy to bucks-worthy, http://buzz2bucks.com.’

Author: Gabrielle Jeans

Today, all real estate professionals must create their own business identity through their branding.  Long gone are the days when we could rely on our company name for our branding.

One of the most important aspects of branding is consistency.  You should be using the same wording (eg. business name, slogan) and graphic design elements for your business identity in all areas of your promotional material.

Domain Name – your domain name should be synonymous with your core business branding, so use it everywhere in your promotional materials.  The goal is having your website name easily remembered and top of mind with prospects when they need a real estate professional’s services.  So have it prominent in the letterhead on your 8.5′ x 11′ print stationary, sticky notes, note pads, business cards, quotation and invoice templates, and any fliers you send out.

Spreading It Everywhere

Branding is psychological.  With branding you’re trying to influence the way people think, not just make your brand memorable.  To some extent your ability to influence people is a function of the quantity of your branding.  The more you advertise, the more likely you’ll be remembered.

Practically speaking, you don’t have a Fortune 500 sized marketing budget, so you need to make the best of what you’ve got.  On your website have your site’s name and logo prominent but not obtrusive on every page.  Have your website link in your email signature.  Write guest articles for popular real estate blogs so you can demonstrate your expertise in a forum recognized as less biased than your own blog.

Comment on blog articles related to real estate and include your website link every time.  Engage in real estate discussions on forum sites like Active Rain and include your website link in your signature when ending each message.  These are great ways of leveraging what you’ve already got in terms of expertise and promotion and making them go even further for you for little or no additional expense.  All of these things will help a lot with your ranking in major search engines like Google.

You can get the most bang for your marketing buck these days by advertising online.  Purchase online banner ads on real estate related websites.  Launch a pay-per-click campaign with a major search engine like Google.  Purchase premium placement for your ads on highly popular classifieds sites like Kijiji and ones local to you.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/branding-for-success-in-real-estate-6046714.html

About the Author

Gabrielle Jeans is an iconic Real Estate Trainer in the North American real estate industry. Founder and CEO of e2000 Training Institute Inc. and Web Tech Dezine Inc., Gabrielle has helped thousands of real estate professionals across North America take their business to new levels of profitability, market penetration and brand recognition. Serving as a coach, mentor and management consultant to everyone from new agents and seasoned veterans to large multi-office real estate brokerages and regional real estate boards, Ms. Jeans empowers real estate agents and sales managers with the tools and strategies to realize exponential growth in business, and it is not uncommon for her clients to enjoy 100to 200 increases in revenue streams within months of retaining her services.

Author: drypen

For the brand concept encompasses all of the brand’s distinctive signs ( name, logo, symbol, colors, endorsing characteristics and even its slogan), it is the brand name that is talked about, asked for or prescribed. It is therefore natural that we should devote particular attention to this fact of the brand creation process: choosing a name for the brand.

What is the best name to choose to build a strong brand? Is there anywhere a particular type of name that can thus guarantee brand success? Looking at some so-called strong brands will help us answer these usual questions: Coca-Cola, IBM, Marlboro, Perrier, Dim, Kodak, and Schweppes … what do these brand names have in common? Coca-Cola referred to the product’s ingredients when it was first created; the original meaning of IBM (International Business Machines) has disappeared; Schweppes is hard to pronounce; Marlboro is a place; Kodak, onomatopoeia. The conclusion of this quick overview is reassuring: to make a strong brand, any name can be used (or almost any), provided that there is a consistent effort over time to give meaning to this name, i.e. to give the brand a meaning of its own.

Does this mean that there is no need to give much thought to the brand name, apart from the mere problem of ensuring that the brand can be registered? Not at all, because following some basic selection rules and trying to choose the right name will save you time, perhaps several years, when it comes to making the baby brand a big brand. The question of time is crucial: the brand has to conquer a territory of its own. From the very start, therefore, it must anticipate all of its potential changes.

The brand name must be chosen with a view to the brand’s future and destiny, not in relation to the specific market and product situation at the time of its birth. As companies generally function the other way around, it seems more than appropriate to provide some immediate information on the usual pitfalls to avoid when choosing a brand name, and also to give a reminder of certain principles.

Brand name or product name?

Choosing a name depends on the destiny that is assigned to the brand. One must therefore distinguish the type of research related to creating a full-fledged brand name – destined to expand internationally, to cover a large product line, and to last – from the opposite related to creating a product name with a more limited scope in space and time. Emphasis, process time and financial investments will certainly be different in both cases.

The danger of descriptive names

Ninety per cent of the time, manufacturers want the brand name to describe the product which the brand is going to endorse. They like the name to describe what the product does (an aspirin that would be called Headache) or is (a biscuit brand that would be called Biscuito; a direct banking service called Bank Direct). This preference for denotative names shows that companies do not understand what brands are all about and what their purpose really is. Remember: brands do not describe products – brands distinguish products.

Choosing a descriptive name also amounts to missing out on all the potential of global communication. The product’s characteristics and qualities will be presented to the target-audience thanks to the advertisements, the sales people, direct marketing, articles in specialized periodicals and the comparative studies done by consumer associations. It would thus be a waste to have the brand name merely repeat the same message that all these communication means will convey in a much more efficient and complete way. The name, on the contrary must serve to add extra meaning, to convey the spirit of the brand. For products do not live forever: their lifecycle is indeed limited.

The meaning of the brand name should not get mixed up with the product characteristics that a brand presents when it is first created. The founders of Apple were well aware of this: within a few weeks the market would know that Apple made microcomputers it was therefore unnecessary to fall into the trap of names such as Micro computers International or computer Research systems. In calling themselves Apple, on the contrary, they could straightaway convey the brands durable uniqueness (and not just the characteristics of the temporary Apple-1): this uniqueness has to do more with the other facts of brand identity that with its physique (i.e. its culture, its relationship, its personality, etc).

The brand is not the product. The brand name therefore should not describe what the product does but reveal or suggest a difference.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/how-to-choose-a-strong-brand-name-5995311.html

About the Author

Drypen provides action-oriented intelligence for management professionals that’s smart, useful, crisp and just a click away.

A Brand Building Strategy Hub

Author: David Little

While stock markets around the world retrace, the financial picture of Greece and Spain flounders and the world holds its collective breath waiting to see if there’ll be an attack on Iran and a spike in oil prices, there is a piece of outstanding economic news for those involved in the place-based digital media market.

2011 was a great year for digital out-of-home advertising, and this year is setting up to be even better. Data from PQ Media released in April show that global digital place-based networks, billboards and signage operators saw revenue grow by 15.3 percent to $6.97 billion last year. This year, the revenue figure is projected to be even better, growing 19.2 percent.

In the United States, DOOH operator revenue climbed by 11.2 percent last year. According to PQ Media, an econometric research and consulting service in Stamford, CT, digital billboard operators saw double-digit revenue growth and operators of place-based networks saw a high single-digital rate of growth.

According to the PQ Media “Global Digital Out-of-Home Media Forecast 2012-16,” the compound annual global growth rate for the five year period will be 13.7 percent. Much of the revenue growth appears tied to a recognition of how important it is to reach consumers outside the home where they make purchases. “While TV remains the 800-pound gorilla of ad-based media due to its reach, scarcity and measurement, DPNs (digital place-based networks) offer brands opportunities to extend their reach by engaging target consumers with contextually relevant content in venues outside the home,” said PQ Media CEO Patrick Quinn.

Digital signage networks were one of the fastest-growing ad-based media in the United States last year. While PQ Media acknowledged a deceleration in the rate of growth in the second half of 2011 due to cyclical economic events, it found digital place-based networks experienced a revenue increase of 10.7 percent from 2006 to 2011.

According to PQ Media, digital place-based networks are likely to benefit indirectly from the Summer Olympics in London and the U.S. political campaign this fall. Both traditionally inject significant revenue into local television stations as well as cable and broadcast networks. This time around, however, PQ Media foresees a scarcity of TV inventory. As a result, major brands squeezed off television could be forced to consider other video platforms, such as digital place-based networks, said Quinn.

The latest revenue tally from PQ Media is another in a growing string of positive developments over the past couple of years for the digital signage industry. Together, they wins demonstrate that digital placed-based media is a viable and being taken seriously by companies with products to sell and the advertising agencies they hire.

The growing availability of audience metrics for digital place-based media is adding a sense of legitimacy about this new medium for those who control where ad dollars get spent. The PQ Media ad revenue numbers, therefore, shouldn’t be too surprising.

Going forward, the next big test for this medium will likely be whether or not those responsible for buying ads will reallocate dollars from television to digital place-based media.

With the possibility of too few available commercial slots on TV in the second half of the year, there might be a hint as to whether digital place-based media can begin taking on the “800-pound gorilla” and winning.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/advertising-articles/digital-signage-advertising-hits-its-stride-5986204.html

About the Author

David Little is a charter member of the Digital Screenmedia Association with 20 years of experience helping professionals use technology to effectively communicate. For further digital signage insight from Keywest Technology, visit our website for many helpful tips and examples. For more in-depth research from Keywest Technology, download our free digital signage white papers and case studies.

Author: Jerry Canavit

Having worked in the creative end of this business for a good while, I have often been asked  ‘How do you come up with advertising ideas?’ Do ideas just happen

So why do some seem to be so prolific at generating ideas while others are seemingly so challenged?  Does it have something to do with genes? Intelligence?

Or, a magic formula?

Well, first let me say that I believe that most everyone has the potential to be creative.

I also believe that those who find success at being creative have identified and practice a problem-solving approach to doing so. They may not understand how the process actually works, but they’ve come to understand that there is a creative process involved.

I’m not even going to attempt to try and analyze this topic in a broad sense, but rather to limit it to how a very definite process is in play when producing messages in marketing communications mediums. I believe there is no magic formula for producing ideas, however, I do believe there is a process that can serve as a guide to how ideas can be generated.

Here are my thoughts:

In marketing communications you can produce ideas in basically two ways. You can ‘borrow’ an existing idea or approach, adapt it to your needs (with slight modification, of course), and Presto, you have your own idea (and we all know there is a lot of that going on out there). Or, you can try to create something that is totally original and unique to the product or service you are promoting.

Now, we all strive to do the latter, however, the truth is that it is very difficult to do this every time. Do you remember the last time you came up with  a totally original idea?

It does happen, but not very often.

More often than not, an advertising idea is a combination of existing ideas that we’ve  seen or heard before, that can be used in a different and unexpected way – the familiar cliché seen differently, if you will. This ability to see and make new combinations is heightened by an ability to see how things relate – and to combine them to create effective and memorable marketing communications messages.

I do believe that the generation of these ideas is the result of a deliberate problem-solving process that leads to this end. I therefore offer two statements which I believe are at the source of idea generation. They are:

  1. An idea is usually a new combination of existing ideas.
  2. The ability to create new combinations is heightened by the ability to see relationships between existing ideas.

…therefore, creativity in advertising communications involves using combinations of known elements and an ability to see relationships that allow these elements to be considered in different ways. With that said, I will continue with a discussion about a technique for producing ideas.

The Five Steps in the Process of Producing Ideas:

Step One: Gather Raw Material.

The gathering process falls into two categories: Specific and General.

Specific: In marketing communications, Specific materials are those relating to the product or service and the people to whom you want to sell this product or service. We need knowledge about the product and the consumer on an intimate level. We dig for FACTS. We do RESEARCH. The process here  is called PREPARATION.

General: Equally as important is General information. This information involves a continuous process of gathering general materials and life experiences that are relative to the problem being solved.

A good analogy here is the kaleidoscope. The kaleidoscope is an instrument that designers can use to look for new patterns. Every turn of this instrument shifts bits of glass into new patterns (or relationships). The more pieces, the more possibilities for new combinations. Comparatively, the more elements stored in your mind, the more chances are increased for the production of new ideas.

To reiterate, Specific information is information relative to the current problem-solving challenge, and General information is the total content of your kaleidoscopic mind reserve – and is a life-long job.  Both contain the seeds for planting – taking us to . . .

Step Two: Into the Mental Maelstrom.

The second step is hard to describe. It goes on entirely in your head. Like chewing food – mashing information and facts together.  Looking for relationships; for a synthesis of where everything will come together like a jigsaw puzzle.

In this part of the process, two things will happen: First, you’ll have partial ideas – some crazy and incomplete. You should write them all down. They may forecast the real idea that is yet to emerge. Writing everything down helps the process.

Second, after a period of time you may tire of trying to fit this puzzle together (not all solutions come quickly). Everything seems jumbled. There seems to be no clear insight anywhere. At this point, you are ready for the next step.

Step Three: Incubation.

The third part of the process can be called the incubation stage. This is where you make absolutely no more conscious effort in looking for a solution. You drop the subject completely and put the whole thing out of your mind. Now I have no idea why this works, but I have found that it does. Apparently, when you turn problems over to your unconscious mind and let it work on its own – it can solve problems. Sometimes it comes in a revelation after a nights sleep – or while in the shower – or during a walk. I have also found that by dropping the problem-solving effort completely and turning to things that stimulate me imaginatively and emotionally – like reading a book, listening to music, or even going to a movie ­– things can happen. Not all solutions come this way, however,  my point here is that it often works this way.

A good example of this technique is in old Sherlock Holmes movies when the famous detective would stop abruptly in the middle of a tough case and begin playing his violin or even drag a baffled Dr.Watson off to a concert. This was, of course, very irritating to the literal-minded Dr. Watson who never seemed to grasp why Holmes would consistently resort to this behavior when they were right in the middle of solving a case. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle understood – for he was a creator and understood the creative process and the power of the unconscious mind.

Now, if you’ve done your homework in the first three steps, you will almost certainly experience the fourth.

Step Four: Eureka!

Out of nowhere the idea can appear. It may come sometime when you least expect it.

For me it’s happened in the middle of the night, when I’m half awake in the morning – or, more often when I’m showering or shaving. For you it might be something different. My point is that ideas can sometimes come seemingly out of nowhere after you’ve stopped all of the conscious straining and have passed through a period of rest and relaxation from the search. And when the idea actually materializes, it can be so all-consuming that it becomes difficult to concentrate on much else. The application of the idea can become so involving that other competing activities can pale into a paralysis. This can provide very difficult challenges if you happen to be in the middle of a meeting or if you are working on an unrelated project with a hot deadline.  Sometimes when the ideas start rolling out quickly, like giving birth, it requires immediate attention.

This step is also particularly difficult in that it involves a constant assessment of the

value of the idea and to see exactly where it can be taken.  This can be a period of frustration for creative people. Some don’t recognize or even care about the process that generated the idea. The truth is that many supervisors expect a well thought out idea delivered according to schedule. The problem here is that the process does not naturally work that way. And, for every good idea, there are always a few clinkers that just don’t work out and you just can’t know beforehand which will work and which will not.

This is a time of constant moulding.

You question everything.

Will it work better this way? Or that?

Is the communication clear?

Is the tone right?

Is it just clever without  making the point effectively?

Is this really as good as I think it is?

Your gut tells you it is!

Right?

Right!

So now you’ve come up with this great idea.

What next?

Step Five: Hello Cruel World.

How will the world react to your newborne creation?

Well, have courage.

You should share your idea with your peers.

Don’t shelter it.

When you do, a surprising thing can happen.

A good idea has self-expanding qualities.

It can stimulate those who see it and make them want to add to it.

Possibilities you had not considered may be brought out.

Congratulations!

Another great idea created.

Maybe you were lucky and hit a home run. Maybe not.

Whether your idea was a good one is not the point here.

What I’ve attempted to do is describe the steps involved in allowing you to produce the idea. The quality of the idea is still in your court.

If your idea is an award winner (great), a bottom-line winner (wonderful),

or both (even better), it’s just the icing on the cake – as we are only concerned about the process here.

Those are my thoughts.

Now, do I finish the three projects that have been laying here on my desk all afternoon?

Or, do I take the afternoon off for some step three incubation time and take in a movie?

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/the-creative-process-5829828.html

About the Author

While creativity is Jerry’s stock in trade, he distinguishes himself by basing solutions on solid marketing objectives. That’s why his work not only receives national attention for its creative content, it also produces increased market share for clients.

A graduate of the University of Texas College of Fine Arts, Jerry is highly trained in the technical aspects of his craft. During the past three decades, he has enhanced his skills with extensive practical experience in the communications arts. He is comfortable creating and developing ideas on the computer, producing television commercials on location, or presenting an advertising campaign in a corporate boardroom.

Jerry has instructed classes in Art Direction, The Business of Advertising and Typography at San Antonio College and has served as AAF judge for advertising awards competition in Albuquerque, NM and Baton Rouge, LA.

Jerry’s rich experience allows him to apply his craft skillfully to a wide range of client needs. His work is seen in a variety of commercial advertising applications and has received a bevy of regional and national awards. With Jerry Canavit heading the  creative team, BK&A Advertising clients enjoy the benefits of unique and award-winning solutions tailored to produce bottom line success.

Author: Linda Mentzer

With super-connectivity, comes increased levels of user influence, and we’d like to take a moment to discuss the where the future of sustained branding lies. Here we’ve put together three of the crucial aspects that marketers need to adapt to in order to achieve superior levels of user engagement and brand advocacy.

1. For The People

It isn’t often that consumers begin to feel an unquenchable love for your products and organization because of the charming sales pitch that your rep delivered. It’s the actual user experience, the product function that they admire and it’s the emotions created by your collateral that drives them to advocacy. And before I forget, it’s also the kind of treatment they receive at your hands. Bad service = zero brandgelising.

2. Keep ‘Em On Their Toes

Consistency is the buzz word when it comes to marketing, and that is increasingly true given the accelerating pace of life we now face. Today’s consumer is the informed consumer – informed to such a degree that I believe the world of hard sell is slowly being rendered completely obsolete. And that’s why it’s vital that marketers keep their best customers on their toes and excited if they intend to develop product-toting, praise-singing brand angels. And yes, social media plays a heavy role in the above advice (more on that later).

You’ll know that your brand advocacy efforts are making headway when you begin to see a lot more repeat customers. Sure, the mass of one-time purchases is what keeps you rolling in dough, but it’s those that buy again and again and again and then some that are on their way to a tryst with your brand.

3. Condensing The World, One Post At A Time

What I said earlier about the informed consumer? This is plays an even more important role in the rapidly widening scope of social media. The ‘network’ seems poised to take over our lives as we become increasingly interconnected. Unlike the one-way public communication that we are used to experiencing, the interactivity of our virtual social space has added new dimensions to the broader flow of conversation. And although this phenomenon is hardly new, the fact that it is unfolding in space that is as sensitive to fluctuation as social media is what most marketers seem to be blind sighted by.

4. Be A Customer Service Nazi
Despite living in an age where one pissed off customer can negate an entire campaign through the power of social media, I still see companies trying to maximize short term gains at the expense of customer service protocols and after-sales initiatives.

I’m well aware that the need to meet profitability quotas can seem overridingly important, but it’s sad to see those objectives achieved at the cost of an increasingly dissatisfied customer-base. Instead, take a long term view and adopt a customer-centric service policy that is consistently upheld and you’ll see true brand advocacy work its magic. In the grand scheme of things, your boss will thank you for it.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/2012-the-changing-face-of-b2b-brand-advocacy-5738926.html

About the Author

Linda Mentzer is a published author and senior marketing manager for an information management company that has helped sell thousands of software products on a global scale. With over 11 years of experience in electronic marketing techniques, Linda has authored articles for several leading business journals, worldwide.

Author: Adam Canfield

Brands and logos; are they synonymous? A person that isn’t business savvy might say that they are, but for your business to be successful, it’s important that you understand the differences between these two words. A logo is a picture or special colors and fonts that you recognize companies by. They’re the Target bulls-eye and the NBC peacock. If you were to show just the logo to someone from a foreign country, they wouldn’t be able to say much about them but when you show it to your friend, they’ll be able to communicate their feelings for the store and television network.

Brands leave a mark, they are not the mark. The logo is the mark. The brand is how the company interacts with its customers. It’s the feelings that you associate with restaurants, electronics, and cars. It’s certainly possible for people to not know the logo but know the brand quite well. If you have a successful brand, you can change your logo without many ill effects. Take time in choosing your logo and try to have it match the vibes of the brand you want to build.

Brands are made by clients while logos are made by companies. A logo alone, while pretty simple to obtain, isn’t enough. You need a brand, which is what will be built as you have repeated positive interactions with customers. They’ll return as repeat customers and drum up more business via word-of-mouth.

Logos illustrate, brands show a purposeful vision. You can’t tell much about Apple from it’s simplistic logo but if you know anything about the company, you know that their brand represents their vision for the future. They are hip, simple but sophisticated, innovative, and leaders in technology. But if you come from a third world country, you might mistake the logo as belonging to an orchard. A brand is built over time and with great purpose. You can always tweak your logo but you must be more strategic in planning how you want your brand to be recognized by future clients.

Brands protect, logos project. Logos give a visual representation of a company. Think of all the logos that you see in your favorite television shows. They are projecting their presence on the viewers. The brand is what protects the image of the company. Maybe someone views the logo unattractive, but if they know the brand behind it, and believe in it, they’ll probably give the company their business.

As you begin to start your business, take time to plan out how you want your brand to look a year, two years, five years in the future and make sure that your actions support those goals. Choose your logo carefully so that it fits with your brand and is a positive reinforcement of your business.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/branding-articles/brands-are-more-than-just-a-logo-5670284.html

About the Author

The author gives off tips and great deals relating to printing, marketing and advertising. For quite some time now, he’s been working with DetroitPrintShop.com – the leading online print solution.

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